David Joseph Constable is a British journalist who uses the byline David J Constable. He writes for a wide range of national magazines and newspapers and is a prolific travel journalist. He is currently working on his first book of collected travel assignments, due for release in Spring 2017.

All photography Copyright © David J Constable unless otherwise stated

 

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waitrose magazine

Waitrose published an Australia Special on the 29th September with their definitive guide to Oz. I have written a piece titled Mountain State about food, drink and fun activities to do in Hobart and Tasmania.

Jamie oliver magazine

The resourceful people of the Greek outpost of Corfu are refusing to be cowed by economic strife and are creating a food-lovers' paradise of barter and sustainability in their beautiful island home.

beekeeping, corfu

 In Corfu I visited Thanasis Kontostanos and his 150+ beehives. We cut out a chunk of honeycomb and with some feta on a fork, wiped it through the runny honey. It tasted sweet and floral, thick like caramel.

 

On assignment for Waitrose Magazine...

In the backwaters of the Antipodes, soaring peaks team with wildlife while a burgeoning food scene showcases some of the best produce in Australia. Welcome to Tasmania...

 
© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

© Chris Crerar

On assignment for Jamie Oliver Magazine...

 

The resourceful people of the Greek outpost of Corfu are refusing to be cowed by economic strife and are creating a food-lovers' paradise of barter and sustainability in their beautiful island home.

 

 
Old Perithia
Old Perithia
© Simon Bajada

© Simon Bajada

On assignment for Civilian...

 

Here’s the problem with champagne (I’m just going to come right out and say it): most of it isn’t very good. Seriously. A lot of what you’ve been drinking is probably Lambrini Bianco or fizz from one of the lesser champagne houses, dare I even say, prosecco or cava served under the guise of champagne. Bottled bubbles fooling suburban rappers and footballer’s wives, who don’t know what they’re drinking or what they’re talking about but waft it with a mischievously wankey air.

 

 

On assignment for Port Magazine...

 

To wander alone in Patagonia, across plains of thorny scrub and through small villages of sheep farmers and grumpy gauchos, is to follow in the footsteps of the fervid writers before me. Those who, bored of the conventional, hot-footed to the “uttermost part of the earth” to disconnect from the shallow artificiality of modern existence.

Bruce Chatwin travelled to South America and Patagonia in 1975, inspired by a piece of brontosaurus skin he’d seen as a child in his grandmother’s cabinet (in fact, it was a cut from a mylodon, or giant sloth). He wrote of Patagonia, “It is the farthest place to which man walked from his place of origins. It is therefore a symbol of his restlessness.”

 
©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

©Julien Capmeil

On assignment for Tatler...

 

I'm in the gardens of the Museum of Tahiti and way out of my comfort zone. It's 40˚C, I'm surrounded by burly athletes dressed in sarongs, and tourists are pointing their Nikons in my face. My shoulders are blistered and peeling, and my feet are slippery in the sweat and dirt of my flip-flops. Who wears flip-flops to a competitive sports event? Mo Farah doesn't. But I do. I'm here to participate in the three-week long Heiva I Tahiti (hei means 'to assemble' and va means 'community'), a sort of Tahitian mini-Olympics that attracts hundreds of competitors from across the islands.